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numbers picked out. thanks so much. >> it's five bucks. all right. i'll do it. good luck to all of us. see you tomorrow. it's 9:00 a.m. on the east coast. 6:00 a.m. in the west. i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. we begin in libya. new day and new sounds of violence in tripoli. explosions and anti-aircraft fire echo across the capital. we'll get the latest from there. >>> witnesses say in government tanks and snipers are in the center of misurata and thofrs a hospitals are overflowing. gadhafi says he will defeat the coalition by any method. and that coalition is growing. this morning we learned that kuwait and jordan joining the list of countries against gadhafi. just minutes ago turkey joined the group. it will provide warships and a submarine to enforce an arms embargo against libya. this military action could be long and drawn out. here's what president obama said about that in an interview with cnn. >> gadhafi may try to hunker down and wait it out even in the face of a no-fly zone even though his forces have been degraded. but keep in mind that we don't just have milita
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
. joining us now from jerusalem, david horowitz, ed tore of the "washington post." he will be joining us about what's happening on the ground. we're looking at pictures out of jerusalem. you can see the scene there. a lot of questions, chaotic scene as people scramble to safety to figure out what had actually occurred, what took place. this comes amid a great deal of tension in the middle east, and this is just the latest that we have seen this coming out of israel between israelis and the palestinians, a conflict, and as you know, a peace that has not been achieved in that particular area. we are still waiting for more information, but you can tell from the pictures there, folks are on the phone, trying to get information, clearing the streets, the emergency personnel trying to evacuate the scene. we understand that we have a medic who is on the phone now who is joining us. sir, can you give us your name? >> i am with the american services. >> where are you now? >> i'm on the scene. we are nearly two hours after the explosion. it occurred a few minutes after 3:00 our time next to a bus
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
described to us as a rocket attack, launched by qaddafi's army, captured by cell phone video, and that video foes on for quite a while. it's clear now his forces still on the offensive in so many parts of that country, and that's where we pick up the story this morning, good morning here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom" and here we go again. martha: good morning, everybody, i am martha maccallum, great to have you with us. qaddafi's colorful remarks making headlines this morning, he is refusing to back down, with supporters now forming a human shield to protect him at his main compound in the capitol of tripoli. libya's leader, sending this very clear message: >> i'm not afraid to -- of cyclones, i'm not afraid of rains that hover over our heads. i'm standing over here, to fight. to fight them. i am here. i'm here. i'm here. martha: there he is. and there you have it. rick leventhal joining us now with live coverage of all of this, streaming today from benghazi. good morning, rick. >> reporter: good morning, martha. and both sides are talking tough. a rebel spokesman -- or spoke
in the west. george is taking time off. great to have dave muir with us. >> good morning, so sad. >> so sad, we're learning about the in legendary actress, liz taylor passing away. she died of congestive heart failure. surrounded the her four children. >> she was hospitaled six weeks ago, her condition stabilized. it was hoped she could return home. obviously not to be. one of her sons calling her an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest with great passion, humor and love. we'll talk to our friend in a few minutes. >> liz taylor with those beautiful violet eyes. >> i know. >> she went on to film 50 h films, married 8 times, twice to richard burton. sharyn alfonsi has more on liz taylor's extraordinary life. she was just 12 years old when she filmed "national velvet" in 1954. >> she grew to be one of the most beautiful women in hollywood. she was maggie in "hot tin roof." >> is it a wonder? do you know what i feel like? i feel like a cat on a hot tin roof. >> reporter: by the time she played cleopatra in 1963, she was one of the most famous women in the w
on the constitutionality of mandatory health care but don't want to talk about who pays for the uninsured. that would be us. unless we let them die. what does that cost every year, both financially and in human misery? thanks as always for your comments and continue to the conversation facebook.com/carolcnn. >> thank you, carol. >>> cnn newsroom continues right now with randi kaye in for ali velshi. >> thank you. we're on top of four big stories this hour. allies making inroads in libya. japan reacting to radioactive tap water in tokyo. the first terrorist bombing in jerusalem since 2004. and the passing of a ledged age. that word is sadly overused but no one wore it better than elizabeth taylor. remarking on her death today at 79, taylor's friend elton john said, we have just lost a hollywood giant. more importantly, we have lost an incredible human being. taylor had suffered for years from congestive heart failure and was hospitalized in los angeles for weeks. a former cnn colleague knew elizabeth taylor well and spoke with her many times on the air and off. we're talking about larry king. he joins me no
's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bob. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, ann. we have to point out that the levels of radiation in the drinking water in tokyo are much lower than they are in many cities in the world. as you point out, infants might be at some risk. it has to be unsettling for parents. there is another indication of as long as the reactor keeps spewing radiation we'll have more problems. at the reactor there is hopeful news but more problems, an indication that this is not coming to an end. at this water plant that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found radioactive iodine twice as high as the standard for infants. parents were told to give infants only bottled water. again today black smoke from reactor number 3 forced workers to temporarily evacuate the site. with radiation continuing to leak from the plant workers hooked up power lines to all six reactors. it could be weeks before the cooling systems are operational. reactor 1 reached dangerous temperatures today. work at reactor 2 halted after high levels of radiation we
health problems over the years. more details later on. nato said it will start using warships to enforce a united nations arms embargo against libya. also, u.s.-led coalition aircraft attack a base used by moammar gadhafi's forces to strike at the rebel-held city of misrata. president obama flies home from el salvador today and says a plan to hold off the leadership role in libya will go into effect this week. radiation levels in tokyo's water supply are now too high for infants. they are telling parents to use bottled water instead. meantime workers trying to stop radiation leaks at a damaged nuclear power plant were temporarily evacuated today when smoke rose from the complex again. detroit's population has plummeted by 25% over the past decade. this according to startling new census data. the former industrial powerhouse now has the smallest population its had since 1910. google's plan to digitize every book ever published and distribute them online has been rejected by a federal judge. over 15 million books have been scanned in the project that would have created the largest digital
was for it before he was against it. >> it's whatever he can use to make some -- >> don't be so cynical. mike barnicle, seemed like a good idea until obama did it, now it just makes no sense at all. >> that's what i was going to m working overtime with newt. we have a couple clips portraying just exactly what you pointed out, joe. three weeks ago he's for doing exactly what president obama did and all of a sudden innocent last three days he's opposed everything president obama has done. >> can i pretend to disagree? >> yes. >> try. >> you can. give it a try. >> he was for intervention, then he thought it was too late and he didn't like the way it was executed in a multilateral way. if you're going for newt inconsistencies and hypocrisies, this one doesn't move the needle for me. >> just admit you've now salvaged the newt gingrich chapter of game change two, halperin. he's still talking to you. willie geist, before we get to news, i'm telling you, people are -- i'm dead serious. mark halperin talked about this in his note. it may be in vogue to make fun of donald trump's presidential run but w
to the fullest with great passion and humor and love. though her loss is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her endearing contribution to our world. her remarkable body of work in film and ongoing successes of businesswoman and her brave and relentless advocacy in the fight of hiv and aids has always made it an incredibly proud of what she has accomplished. taylor was one of the last onscreen goddesses nominated multiple times for best actress in the academy awards oscar finally came for her performance in "butterfield aaden" in the '60s. she won second time for "who's afraid of virginia woolf." her private life was every bit as dramatic as her onscreen roles. married eight times. actor richard burton became her husband twice. later in life, elizabeth -- her act career, when she published a book and focused her attention on the world's aids epidemic. . in recent years as you mentioned she struggled with her health and hospitalized the last six weeks. again, her family, her four children, ten grandchildren were by her side when she passed e
? >> at least she's coming out of the penalty to be with us. good morning, america. we have david muir with us, as george continues to take time off. you know what we're going to do this morning? we're going to celebrate elizabeth taylor's life. and our colleague, barbara walters, shares her memories of the icon. and we'll have a look at her jaw-dropping jewels. and the men in her life that lavished her with those jewels. >>> also coming up in this first half hour, what critics are calling a political stunt. this is out of japan this morning. tokyo's governor downing a glass of tap water, just 24 hours after that water was called radioactive. can it really shift this quickly? >>> we're going to start with the wild weather overnight all across the country. sam will have the forecast in a moment. but first, matt gutman joins us from westmoreland county, pennsylvania. >> reporter: good morning. this is a roof tile. that's the only part of this roof that's left. in 15 seconds of terror, residents here tell me that the entire neighborhood was shaking. porches up off the street. houses like this, ma
is facing now new pressure from congress over the u.s. military's role in libya. >> republicans are now demanding specifics from the president about his goals in libya. john hendren has the latest from washington. good morning, john. >> reporter: good morning. as the military operation in libya enters its sixth day, at least in public, moammar gadhafi is showing no sign of giving up. sources say obama administration officials have told european allies they want to hand off control of the international operation in libya this week. nato is already activating ships and planes in the mid terrain yan, a move president obama describes as u.s. exit strategy. >> the exit strategy will be executed this week in the sense that we will be pulling back from our much more active efforts to shape the environment. >> reporter: in benghazi they're cheering a no-fly zone as airborne life line. pro-democracy rebels are holding onto that area. secretary of state hillary clinton calls it the humanitarian catastrophe that did not happen. >> gadhafi' troops were poised to enter benghazi over the weekend, put
. >>> now to a story that shocked even us, even though we work the tough overnight hours. staffing at air traffic control towers around the country is being reviewed after two planes were forced to land at one of the nation's busiest airport without the tower's help. the lone controller apparently nodded off. jim sciutto reports from reagan national. >> reporter: for more than 20 harrowing minutes the tower at reagan national airport had gone ominously quiet. at 12:10 american airlines flight 1900 from dallas could not reach the tower after being handed over from regional controllers. the pilot executed a go-round following routine aviation procedure. failing to raise the tower on the second approach, the pilot treated the airport as if it were uncontrolled and landed. 15 minutes later, a united flight was also unable to contact anyone in the reagan tower. >> tower is apparently unmanned. called on the phone and nobody's answering, so that aircraft went in just as uncontrolled airport. >> that's interesting. >> it is. it's happened before, though. >> reporter: both flights landed s
morning. this wednesday our nation will mark a sobering anniversary. one that reminds us how history can sometimes hang just by a thread. it happened 30 years ago only blocks from the white house. the actions of a few quick- thinking people made all the difference. bob schieffer will be telling us all about it in our sunday morning cover story. >> schieffer: the scene has been replayed countless times on our tvs, but what many of us have forgotten or maybe never really knew is what a close call it really was. >> mr. president. (gun fire). >> he had the most scripted presidency. this was its most unscripted day. >> schieffer: later on sunday morning, the day we almost lost a president. >> osgood: the business world is all abuzz these days over houlder shultz's piping hot ambitions. katie couric this morning will join him for a birthday celebration. >> we're 200,000 partners strong. >> only been up since 3:00. >> couric: he's got as much energy as the triple shot expresso. >> we discovered a piece of equipment.... >> reporter: starbucks ceo howard shultz has seen his company through thick
again. >>> and defiance, as u.s. and allied forces pound targets in libya for a fourth straight night, moammar gadhafi emerges in public to tell his supporters he will be victorious. this as president obama heads home to work on handing over responsibility for the no-fly zone and nato finally prepares to step in after a diplomatic back and forth, all early this wednesday morning, march 23rd, back and forth, all early this wednesday morning, march 23rd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. i'm erica hill with chris wragge. we begin with this breaking news. dame elizabeth taylor has died. >> screen legend and a hollywood icon, long considered one of the most beautiful, most talented women in all of hollywood lore. just a sad day for hollywood. a woman whose life will be celebrated that's for sure. >> there's much to celebrate in that life. her publicist saying the three-time oscar winner, just as famous for her life off screen including the eight marriages and her very important humanitarian work, her publicist says she died of congestive heart failure this morning at cedars
a celebrated hollywood career, and who used her celebrity to raise millions to help in the fight against aids, and the fear and silence that shrouded public understanding of the disease. the life of elizabeth taylor, tonight on a "second look." >>> good evening. and this is a "second look." she once said she couldn't remember a time when she was not famous. this week, a woman who was once known worldwide simply as "liz" died. elizabeth taylor's first movie was released when she was just 10 years. her movies made her a star, but the life she lived in the public eye contributed to her legend. married eight times, twice after richard burton. she traveled the world with her children following her daily life. she had three oscars and many of her hollywood costars described her as a life-long friend. when one of those friends rock hudson came down with a then barely-understood illness, she raised money against aids and sometimes, that brought her here to san francisco. >> i am here once more to ask for your help, your compassion, and your love. i am here for those who cannot be here to ask for them
says the rules need to be changed immediately. >>> targeting libya. u.s. and allied forces continue air strikes for the fifth straight night, but fail to stop moammar gadhafi from attacking a key rebel-held area. and in washington, the speaker of the house takes on president obama, as to why he didn't talk to congress before launching the attacks. >>> and remembering a legend. fans, friends, and some of hollywood's biggest stars honor elizabeth taylor's work both on-screen and off as the nation mourns the passing of the big-screen icon. we're going to look back at her life and her love, "early" this thursday morning, march 24th, life and her love, "early" this thursday morning, march 24th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. i'm chris wragge. >> and i'm erica hill. boy do we have a talker of a story. >> is this a stunner or what? it tops our news this morning. we begin with the investigation of washington's reagan national airport, where air traffic controller apparently just fell asleep on the job early wedn
's a wet wednesday march 23 i'm frank mallicoat. >> i'm sydnie kohara. thanks so much for joining us. your time is 6:00. 11 straight days of rain and counting. >> a lot. >> we want team coverage on this morning's storm. anne makovec live in marin, where there's some flooding. elizabeth wenger at the bay bridge, but first off let's start with a check of weather and traffic, lawrence in the weather center and we can see that hi-def doppler behind us. >> it's been ripping around the bay area this morning, folks. if you are on the roads be careful. the cold front literally coming through right now stretching down from vacaville, fairfield into concord and livermore and fremont. pockets the moderate to heavier rainfall into pleasant hill and concord. you see the cell moving by now and we have seen some strong gusty winds with that. we have gusts over 30 miles per hour, even one over 50 miles per hour. so you get the idea the cold front moving by. the heaviest amounts of rainfall probably this morning. then showers into the middle of the morning. flash flood watches in the coastal sections and t
, all of us at school, we all wanted to look like her, have the big eyebrows, and the black hair, and the beauty mark. and she was phenomenal, and i kept a scrap book on her, which is why it was so fascinating for me a few years later in hollywood to meet her at mgm in the make-up room. and that she was so sweet, because she was showing pictures of her children to everybody. and she was very baudy. i think that's something a lot of people didn't know about her, she liked a salty turn of phrase, but then us english actresses did that. >> you shared a fall of husbands. you have 13 between you. >> that's true. and in fact the last time i got a divorce, she sent me a note and said i'm still ahead by three. i said, don't worry, liz, i'm going to catch up. i didn't call her liz, i always called her elizabeth. she didn't like being called liz. i think people had a huge amount of respect for her, the thing that was so amazing about her, most women really liked her. she was a gal's gal, you know? like carol just said, she was so one of the girls, and people -- men just fell all over thems
and everybody -- all my friends, all of us at school, we all wanted to look like her. we all wanted to have the big eyebrows, and we all wanted to have the black hair and the beauty mark, and she was phenomenal, and i kept a scrapbook on her, which is why it was so fascinating for me a few years later in hollywood to actually meet her at mgm in the makeup room, and she was so sweet because she -- she was showing pictures of her children to everybody, and she was very bawdy. you know, i think that's something that a lot of people didn't know about her. she liked a salty turn of phrase, but then us english actresses always did do that. >> and apart from great acting, you also shared, of course, a penchant for men and husbands. joan, i hope you don't mind me saying that. you have 13 between you. >> oh, that's true, and, in fact, the last time that i got a divorce, she sent me a note, and she said, "i'm still ahead by three." i said -- i sent one back saying, "don't worry, liz. i'm going to catch up." and, liz -- i actually didn't call her liz. i always called her elizabeth because she didn't l
270,000 dinners to date. every one of this year's cnn heros are chosen from people you tell us about. so to nominate someone you know who is making a big difference, go to cnn heroes.com. that does it for this >>> tonight, hollywood's farewell to elizabeth taylor. inside the star's exclusive sendoff. only her very closest friends and family were at the funeral. and tonight, i'll talk to two of them. the best man from one of elizabeth's eight weddings and friends who are royalty. >>> and an exclusive interview with matthew mcconaughey, surfer dude, an actor who's romanced some of the most glamorous women on screen and off. tonight things you don't know about matthew mcconaughey. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening, elizabeth taylor did everything her way and her final farewell was no different. the star gave instructions she was to be fashionably late to her own funeral, exactly 15 minutes to be precise. and she was laid to rest near her good friend, michael jackson. the one-hour service included a poetry reading by actor colin farrell. also among the mourners, vict
quarter of a four-quarter game. >> of course, but at the end the president is moving us through a difficult period. we'll hear from him monday. i can't wait. will, thank you for being here. folks, thank you for watching, have a great weekend. "piers morgan tonight" starts right now. >>> tonight, hollywood's farewell to elizabeth taylor. inside the star's exclusive sendoff. only her very closest friends and family were at the funeral. and tonight, i'll talk to two of them. the best man from one of libya's eight weddings -- elizabeth's eight weddings and friends who are royalty. >>> and an exclusive interview with matthew mcconaughey, surfer dude, an actor who's romanced some of the most glamorous women on screen and off. tonight things you don't know about matthew mcconaughey. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening, elizabeth taylor did everything her way and her final farewell was no different. the star gave instructions she was to be fashionably late to her own funeral, exactly 15 minutes to be precise. and she was laid to rest near her good friend, michael jackson. t
that makes us happy having family, having connections? >> yes. oprah: having connections? and without the connections--because you can't connect to things, so if you're just buying more things to make yourself happy, you will never be happier because things can't give anything back to you. >> that's right. oprah: take our happiness quiz and to find out more about goldie's organization, the hawn foundation, helping children to be happier, go to oprah.com. dan's new book, "thrive," is out in stores now. come on, get happy, everybody. thank you. >> happiness. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] also delicious. ♪ ♪ like nature valley. granola bars made with crunchy oats and pure honey. because natural is not only good it also tastes good. nature valley -- 100% natural. 100% delicious. @@ >> forrest and rose dated, are you ready for this, for 28 years. >> are they sure it's the right thing? >> taking it slow, making sure it's the right one. they met at a senior center dance in 1983.
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)